Good Things to Do and NOT Do If the Layoff Notice Comes…07.25.08

25 07 2008

I certainly don’t expect or plan on being laid off and there are no indications to the contrary.  I am trying to be of increasing value to my employer as time goes on. Hopefully, it will be noticed.

You never know, however, what a day will bring forth. 

Lifehacker referred to an article in today’s New York Times entitled “If Your Being Laid Off or Expecting to Be” by Marci Alboher [http://shiftingcareers.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/07/25/if-youre-laid-off-or-expecting-to-be/].  Here are highlights I though were worth noting:

“…We began by talking about the things you shouldn’t do after being laid off, like saying disparaging things about your former employer to anyone other than close friends and family.

We then moved on to some of the more practical elements — making sure that your résumé is in order, that you have something presentable to wear to interviews and professional meetings and that you have spiffed up your online presence, if that is appropriate in your field.

We spent a good bit of time talking about touching base with all the crucial people in your network. And in times like this, when so many layoffs are driven by the slowing economy, there really is no need to feel any shame when picking up the phone to share the news with someone and ask for support, job leads or introductions. Often it’s the weak ties — the friends of your closest friends, for example — not the strong ties, that lead to opportunities. So make sure that you are systematically trying to reach those people. Linkedin [http://www.linkedin.com/] is a very good tool for locating people who are one or two degrees away from your immediate circle. Another way is to start putting out the word to everyone you come into contact with that you are open to introductions.

Finally, I suggested that people do some writing. While it may feel like an odd time for gratitude, you may make some good impressions by composing a few handwritten thank you notes to those who have helped you in your career. Similarly, if you can craft a graceful departure e-mail thanking colleagues for their support, providing your personal contact information and saying you are open to any leads or introductions, again you may be pleased with the results…”

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