Bing’s Shinning Haunted Hotel…10.31.09

31 10 2009




Web 2.0 For Libraries in Tough Times…10.31.09

31 10 2009




Library 2.0 Marketing Strategy…10.31.09

31 10 2009

library20mememap Here is an excerpt from Web 2.0 & Marketing: Develop a Strategy from Start to Finish from the Strategic Librarian:

“…Similar to an intranet or web site project, the use of Web 2.0 should be planned carefully to be used strategically.  Hhhmmm… that sounds like a strategic plan is in order or in the very least – a plan.  Here are some suggestions for steps that need to be taken to make your plan strategic:

Do’s Don’ts
Get a cross functional team together and begin defining the goals and/or objectives (We will call them goals) in using Web 2.0.  Ask simple questions like who and why?  Who tells you the market you are trying to reach and the why tells you what problem you are trying to solve. Define goals without tapping the insight of others.
Reach out to others in the organization to ask them for their thoughts on goals, etc.  This not only improves the goals that are set, but also starts to build buy-in and support for what will be done to meet those goals. Set goals in isolation from others in the organization.  If marketing department sets goals without asking the individuals who have the closest and most direct contact to clients, the result may be very limited.
Interview clients to determine if they are using or are aware of Web 2.0.  Is their hiring practice to purchase services or products based on information from the Internet? Assume if you build it, they will come.
Learn about all the Web 2.0 technologies that you are considering using before starting your project. Use the technologies without having some knowledge about how each works
Consider how each technology supports your defined goals/objectives.  Continue developing answers to questions like what, when, and how. What describes your initiative, when begins the development of a timeline, and how describes the initiative that support each goal. Use Web 2.0 because everyone else is or because someone person in the organization thinks diving into development without considering goals is a good idea.
Develop a project plan for each initiative. Dive in without a plan.
Start with one project (e.g., creating topical blogs) that you have determined to meet the organization’s needs.  When it is complete, move along to the next. Tackle all the projects at once.  This strategy creates confusion, pulls resources in too many directions, and does not allow those resources to do their best on each initiative.
Use change management techniques to assist those in the organization who will need to change how they think or what they do.  Even if the change creates a better mousetrap, people will need to say goodbye to what they know and how they do things before accepting anything new.  Change management should be used from the point that the goals are developed all the way through to acceptance by the organization. Assume everyone will accept what’s new.
Celebrate your success with all involved. Think ‘another day, another dollar’.
Continuously evaluate if the goals are being reached and, if not, what needs to be changed. Sign off on each initiative and think it is done…”




Semantic Web Technologies: Changing Bibliographic Descriptions?…10.31.09

31 10 2009




The Ultimate Zombie Survival Guide…10.31.09

31 10 2009




Cloud Computing and Libraries…10.30.09

30 10 2009




Study of the North American MARC Records Marketplace – Report Release…10.30.09

30 10 2009

metalogue

From the Library of Congress’ newly released Study of the North American MARC Records Marketplace








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 698 other followers