Comparing Social Reading…03.24.11

24 03 2011




Google’s Collateral Damage…03.24.11

24 03 2011





Mobile Marketing…03.24.11

24 03 2011





QR Codes in Libraries…03.23.11

23 03 2011




Lending a Kindle eBook on BookLending.com…03.23.11

23 03 2011




The Atlas of New Librarianship…03.23.11

23 03 2011

The Atlas of New Librarianship





Ebooks @ Computers in Libraries…03.23.11

23 03 2011




LinkedIn reaches 100 million members worldwide…03.22.11

22 03 2011





Lone Wolf Librarian Linked-In Profile…03.22.11

22 03 2011

LinkedIn reaches 100 million members worldwide (SEE INFOGRAPHIC)

Lone Wolf Librarian Linked-In Profile





Mobile Revolution – MobileMarch-2011…03.22.11

22 03 2011




Twitter 5th Anniversary…03.21.11

21 03 2011




Usability Express: Recipe for Libraries…03.21.11

21 03 2011




Design Like Da Vinci…03.21.11

21 03 2011




Using Digital Media to Improve Teaching and Learning…03.20.11

20 03 2011




China’s Social Network Universe (Active Users by Age & Location)…03.18.11

18 03 2011





The Future of Social Influence in a Social Capital World…03.18.11

18 03 2011




Introducing the YouTube Creator Institute…03.17.11

17 03 2011




MIT TechTV – Reinventing the Research Library: The MIT Libraries in the 21st Century

17 03 2011

MIT TechTV – Reinventing the Research Library: The MIT Libraries in the 21st Century.





Tim O’Reilly on The Future of Technology at SXSW…03.17.11

17 03 2011




This Week in Libraries…03.17.11

17 03 2011

 





Libraries and the New Community Information Ecology…03.17.11

17 03 2011

 





Changing Media Agencies…03.17.11

17 03 2011





Everyday Information: The Evolution of Information Seeking in America…03.17.11

17 03 2011

From Amazon:

“All day, every day, Americans seek information. We research major purchases. We check news and sports. We visit government Web sites for public information and turn to friends for advice about our everyday lives. Although the Internet influences our information-seeking behavior, we gather information from many sources: family and friends, television and radio, books and magazines, experts and community leaders. Patterns of information seeking have evolved throughout American history and are shaped by a number of forces, including war, modern media, the state of the economy, and government regulation. This book examines the evolution of information seeking in nine areas of everyday American life.

Chapters offer an information perspective on car buying, from the days of the Model T to the present; philanthropic and charitable activities; airline travel and the complex layers of information available to passengers; genealogy, from the family Bible to Ancestry.com; sports statistics, as well as fantasy sports leagues and their fans’ obsession with them; the multimedia universe of gourmet cooking; governmental and publicly available information; reading, sharing, and creating comics; and text messaging among young people as a way to exchange information and manage relationships. Taken together, these case studies provide a fascinating window on the importance of information in the past century of American life.”





How Social Media is Changing Libraries…03.17.11

17 03 2011




Virtual learning: A world of Opportunity…03.17.11

17 03 2011




Library Sorting Machine…03.16.11

16 03 2011




Librarians, QR Codes and the Gartner Hype Cycle…03.16.11

16 03 2011

An interesting post titled The QR Code Hype Cycle:

The Gartner Hype Cycle is a general graphical representation of the maturity and adoption of a technology. I have reproduced a version for QR Codes showing the relative positions of the West and Japan in the cycle…

You will see that QR Codes in the USA and Europe are in the ‘frenzy of publicity’ phase which is typified by over enthusiasm and unrealistic expectations. We know that they are at this stage because technology news sites like Mashable and ClickZ are publishing nonsensical QR Code statistics and crap advice on an almost daily basis. At the same time self appointed Marketing experts are falling over themselves to offer advice and instruction even though they have yet to design or manage a QR Code campaign.

It’s different in Japan, QR Codes are everywhere and if you have not visited in the last few years it is easy to imagine that scanning these codes is a major preoccupation for the average Japanese. This is not the case. Stand near a typical and prominently displayed QR Code in a busy area of Tokyo and watch what happens. Not very much is the answer, very few people will look at the code and you will be lucky to see someone stop and scan it. This is because in Japan QR Codes have lost their novelty value and they have simply blended into the background, just like other common symbols such as traffic signs. They are simply part of every day life and there has to be a very good reason to stop what you are doing and scan one. Japan has passed the peak of the hype cycle and is now in the ‘disillusionment phase’.

It is reasonable to assume that QR Codes in the West will follow a similar hype cycle path as they have in Japan. In which case it is worth looking at some statistics (not the made up variety!).

 

A June 2009 study from NetAsia Research showed that 76% of the Japanese have or to be more precise “know they have”, the ability to access QR Codes. Obviously some use the facility more or less than others but the average across this group is 1.24 times per week. Not very often is it? The main reasons given for scanning the codes is also illuminating. There are really only three, 31.6% to use a coupon, 30.9% to apply for a special promotion and 22.7% to have more information on a product.

So this is the future of QR Codes in the West. They may generate curiosity or local publicity at the moment but QR Codes on real estate signs, business cards, product packaging etc., are not going to increase sales just because they are present. QR Codes that provide deep discounts, free samples, exclusive content etc., may increase sales but the number of scans and conversions will depend on the value of the offering.

Bottom line – design your QR Code campaign carefully, provide as big a reward to the consumer as possible and even then be prepared to be underwhelmed by the response.”





Augmented Reality For Marketers: Future of Consumer Interactions…03.16.11

16 03 2011




SXSW Top 10 List…03.16.11

16 03 2011




Have You Looked At Blogger Lately…03.14.11

14 03 2011







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