“How Social Networking Can Ruin Your Library’s Reputation”…08.18.09

18 08 2009

social-networking-images

Here is an interesting and valuable post from Social Networking in Libraries titled How Social Networking Can Ruin Your Library’s Reputation:

“…Here are some things that could happen and how to avoid them.

1. Trying to use too many social networking sites to promote your library. This can confuse your patrons and staff and be too time consuming. Pick one or two and focus on these.

2. Angering your patrons. If a patron becomes angry enough or annoyed enough they may use social networking to tell everyone about it and this can end up being a nightmare.

3. Not keeping track about what is being posted on your library social networking sites. This can cause content or comments to be posted that are spammy or that are not what you would like. If you are going to use social networking with your library then you need to keep track of what is being said and posted…”

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Facebook Most Used Social Media For Sharing…07.20.09

20 07 2009

addtoany-graph

Mashable! reports today that “…According to AddToAny, Facebook now dominates sharing, with 24 percent of shares from the widget consisting of users posting items to the social network. That handily beats out email (11.1 percent) and TwitterTwitter (10.8 percent), making the world’s most popular social network also the most popular service for sharing content. This is undoubtedly welcome news at FacebookFacebook, as the site continues to emphasize sharing and readies its own real-time search engine…”





Educational Objectives Taxonomy and Web 2.0 Tools…06.26.09

26 06 2009

Thanks to the Baby Boomer Librarian for posting the following interesting image in Bloom’s Taxonomy applied to Web 2.0 tools today:

Digital_Blooms

“…Like other taxonomies, Bloom’s is hierarchical; meaning that learning at the higher levels is dependent on having attained prerequisite knowledge and skills at lower levels (Orlich, et al. 2004). A goal of Bloom’s Taxonomy is to motivate educators to focus on all three domains, creating a more holistic form of education.”





15 Social Media Maxims for Librarians, Markerters, Etc…06.01.09

1 06 2009

social-media

Here is a good excerpt to consider from SearchEngineWatch.com post 15 Social Media Maxims for Markerters:

“…Here are 15 social media maxims:

  1. Successful marketers will be more like Dale Carnegie and less like David Ogilvy; listen first, sell second.
  2. Consumers are looking to peers for recommendations on products, services, health issues, and more via social media. Only companies that produce products and services of great value will be part of these conversations; mediocrity will quickly be eliminated.
  3. Social media’s ability to quickly disseminate information among friends and peers helps eliminate different people performing the same tasks (multiple individual redundancies), whether it’s researching the best vacation spot or smart phone. This results in a more efficient society.
  4. The old adage that you can only have two of these — cheap, quick, or quality — doesn’t hold true within social media. It’s possible to have all three.
  5. Successful social media marketers will function more like entertainment companies, publishers, or party planners rather than as traditional advertisers.
  6. With the increasing popularity of e-books, there will be new digital media placement opportunities for brands. This is very similar to product placement in movies, only this is for books, and the placements are clickable and measurable.
  7. The most successful social media and mobile applications are those that allow users to brag, compete, or look cool by passing it on.
  8. The transparency and speed of information exchanged within social media mitigates casual schizophrenic behavior. Having a ‘work’ personality and having a ‘party’ personality will soon become extinct. People and companies will need to have one essence and be true to that essence.
  9. Being ‘well-rounded’ as a company or individual is less beneficial. It’s more productive to play to your core strength. This differentiates you from the competition.
  10. Companies that produce great products and services rather than companies that simply rely on great messaging will be winners in a Socialnomic™ world. The social graph is the world’s largest and most powerful referral program.
  11. Marketers’ jobs have changed from creating and pushing to one that requires listening, engaging, and reacting to potential and current customer needs.
  12. Making multiple mistakes within social media is far better than doing nothing at all.
  13. If you’re a large brand, you can rest assured that there are conversations, pages, and applications constantly being developed around your brand and by the community at large. The social community is ‘doing’ social media even if your company chooses not to.
  14. The information exchanged in social media in relation to job searching and recruiting has rendered it unrecognizable from the information exchanged 10 years ago. Appropriate matches between employer and employee have increased as a result of an increased information flow.
  15. The overall achievement of individuals and companies will be largely dependent on their social media success…”




Social Media Challenges – “Doing Social Media Right in 2009″…05.29.09

29 05 2009




“Friending Libraries: Why libraries can become nodes in people’s social networks”…05.29.09

29 05 2009

“Lee discussed Pew Internet’s latest findings and why they suggest that libraries can play a role in people’s social networks in the future. He described the reasons that people rely more and more on their social networks as they share ideas, learn, solve problems, and seek social support. And he explored how libraries can act as ‘nodes’ in people’s networks.”




How Libraries Should Use Facebook…05.27.09

27 05 2009

facebooklibrary

I thought Stephen Abram‘s post today Facebook and Libraries has some important points about libraries using Facebook:

“There’s some emerging consensus on how libraries might use Facebook. I am no expert but, as usual I have an opinion.

You have a choice. You can create a regular Facebook Page or a Facebook Group (sometimes called a Facebook Fan Page). Simple really. What would work best in which situation?

As other’s have noted (here and here), it can be very problematic if you use a page for your library institutional presence. (‘Facebook ties a page to the account of the person who originally created it and I quote’ and ‘the original creator of the Page may never be removed by other Page admins.’ So, if your original creator leaves under a cloud your organization is at risk.)

Groups let you own your presence on an institutional level and allow the creator to be removed and assigned to others. For comparisons of pages and groups see this and this.

Of course the creation of a Facebook Group for your library does NOT absolve staff from having individual Facebook pages. Staff and management are individual experts and the key competitive advantage your library has against the generic search engines. If they’re not marketed well, and marketing themselves and building relationships with their key user groups then your library is just vanilla.

So, my opinion is that the library and it’s important segments have group pages and that librarians and key staff have their own pages. Try it.”